Critical Theories and Liturgical Studies

A small seminar of people who read and react to one another’s scholarship, focusing on the intersections of liturgical studies with recent discourses such as but not limited to post-modernism, post-structuralism and critical theory.

Convener

Gerald Liu
Gerald.liu@ptsem.edu

Seminar Report 2020

Convener

Gerald C. Liu, Assistant Professor of Worship and Preaching at Princ- eton Theological School, United Methodist Elder of the Mississippi Annual Con- ference and Minister in Residence at the Church of the Village in Manhattan

Members in Attendance

Martin Connell, Layla Karst, Gerald C. Liu, Jason Smith, Stephanie Budwey, Sarah Johnson, Kristine Suna-Koro, Tony Alonso, Jonghyun Kim

Visitors in Attendance

Kat Olson, Nick Peterson, J. Terry Todd

Description of Work

We discussed the following papers and held a joint session discussing Liturgy and Pain with the Liturgical Hermeneutics Seminar.

Papers and Presentations

  • Sarah Johnson, “Religion as Practice, Ethnography as Theology, and Dialogue between Sociology of Religion and Liturgical Studies.”
  • Jason Smith, “Sin and Liturgy in Political ”
  • Kristine Suna-Koro, “Liturgy and Lament: Postcolonial Reflections from the Midst of a Global Refugee ”
  • Stephanie Budwey, “Liturgies of livability or liturgical violence: What kind of space are we creating for non-binary individuals?”
  • Layla Karst, “Symbolizing Sin and Sanctity: A Holy, Sinful Church?”
  • Martin Connell, “Born in a Wreck: Baptism, Original Sin, and Godparenting in The Violent Bear It ”
  • Gerald Liu, “The Illusory Association of Piety to Patterns of ”

Other Work and Plans for the Future

For our next session, we plan to discuss 10–12 page papers responding to the question, ‘What is liturgy?’

Seminar Report 2019

Convener

Kimberly Hope Belcher, Tisch Family Assistant Professor of Theolo- gy at the University of Notre Dame, where she teaches sacramental and liturgical theology and ritual studies.

Members in Attendance

Antonio Alonso, Kimberly Hope Belcher, Stepha- nie Budwey, James Farwell (by Skype), Sarah Kathleen Johnson, Layla Karst, James Marriott, Martha Moore-Keish, Jason Smith, Rebecca Spurrier, Kristine Suna-Koro

Visitor in Attendance

Jaewoong Jung

Description of Work

We had two closely related themes this year: inclusion and exclusion in the liturgy, and multiple liturgical belonging. Papers considered ecumenism and interreligious dialogue, intersex persons’ perspectives, migration and liturgical identity, and worship as intervention and suicide prevention, using a mix of systematic and qualitative methods. We held two joint sessions with the Comparative Liturgical Theology seminar on how Comparative theology should consider liturgical practice as a mode of belonging.

Other Work and Plans for the Future

We enjoyed the joint sessions with Comparative Liturgical Theology and plan to do more joint sessions in the coming years. Next year our theme is sin and pain in the liturgy, and we will have a joint session with Liturgical Hermeneutics on pain.